Are we always happy? Where’s the EMOTION!?

This blog post was inspired by Deanna and her Tuesday post of a photo related to her photo essay topic, being human. Scrolling through my news feed on Twitter, I saw many beautiful and creative photos of all different sorts. Most were photos of objects, scenery, etc. There were not many with people in them. I found this rather interesting being as the generation we are in, pictures are always of people whether it be a selfie, group photo, photo bomb, whatever your choice of photo is.

Generally speaking, I think people often see people as “normal” as Deanna is speaking of in her photo essay proposal. People being normal often leads to the question “Why take a picture of them?” We like pictures that get likes, we want pictures people are going to look at and say wow, or I wish I was there. Our selfies have filters and are edited to our liking before anyone else gets to view them.

In her picture above, the concept of emotion in a picture is beautiful. The model in this case is being human, caught off guard doing what she normally does, laughing and smiling. This is not planned or photo-shopped, no filters needed. This is genuine and real. A photograph that shows who the real person is.

emotionally-intelligent

Take the photo above for example, a woman who has multiple faces, all photographed in one picture. Are they all her? Yes of course, does she choose which one she wants to “wear” that day? Maybe, depending on her story. BUT, is she human in all of them? YES! Everyone has these faces, these emotions but do we ever photograph anything other than happy, excited, surprised, etc? Have you ever taken a picture while crying or after crying and someone else saw it?

Photographs as we know and read in class, hold value. Or as Berger says, holds property value depending on certain aspects. The frequency of the photo, the originality of the photo, has it been remade or redone. On Instgram, you can find a million pictures of people in their natural state doing something they love with a smile on their face but what value does that have?

We know at the end of the day, that person, every person has more than one emotion, so how come we never photograph that?

Emoticons

Adding emotion and feelings to your photographs – check it out!!

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18 thoughts on “Are we always happy? Where’s the EMOTION!?

  1. I like the whole idea behind this post and Deanna’s essay. You’re both right in that we see a bunch of photos daily, but we don’t really notice the emotion behind them. Sometimes all a photo needs is eye contact into a lens to let the viewer feel something. I think we should put more value into the things we are taking pictures of and posting and realize there is power in the pictures we take.

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  2. It’s interesting that you brought this concept of basically putting on a show for our followers to see. Personally, I know when I upload photos on social media I am also smiling and acting like I’m happy, regardless to my actual mood – bored, hungry, upset, etc. It really does bring up the point why do we feel the need to pretend we are always in great moods? I think it always goes back to the perception we want people to have of us, our lives are “perfect,” and we are always smiling.

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  3. This is a cool blog post. I really can relate to the message you are portraying through the images. I often see people that use these masked images of themselves via social media. There is no question people do this on a daily basis. It is quit annoying if you ask me. I think the main reason this happens is due to lack of self esteem. If people receive positive feedback from these pictures, they feel better about themselves. Everyone portrays a perfect life on the internet and tend to leave out the human moments. Often times social media is a really negative reflection of one’s self. It causes us to compare our lives to others and that never ends good.

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  4. I really like how you brought this up. Not many people mention that no matter what a persons actual mood is they generally give everyone a fake perception of themselves.
    Like you said, “all pictures hold value” I personally do have pictures of my in my natural state, laughing, making a mean face towards my boyfriend, and dancing with my little sister just to name a few. They personally hold value to me because it is simply me being me. I do have pictures simply smiling but I myself do not go above and beyond to smile in every picture I post just for likes (not saying that’s what every person does, but some do).
    I actually just had this conversation with a friend of mine. She wasn’t completely smiling and decided to take down her photo simply because she only got twenty-three likes. We all have many faces that can be interpreted in different ways. People should be less scared to show them to others.

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  5. I really like your post because it reminds me of my photo essay. In my essay I am trying to show that taking candid photos hold more value than posed pictures. In a posed picture where everyone is smiling how do you really know that all those people are happy? The thing is you don’t. In my photo essay I am using candid shots of my boyfriend to show that everyday actions speak louder than words.

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  6. I enjoyed this post because it raises so much question about photographing others. We often take the time to pose and “say cheese,” however, the whole purpose of the photo is to capture a moment or event. I think if we spent more time taking candids and sporadic pictures, we would remember more about that moment. I like how you raised the topic of being human too. We spend too much time portraying what others want to see rather than who we really are. I think that the photo of the woman with multiple faces really captures this idea.

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  7. I especially enjoyed your blog post because it reminds us in the midst of a photo project that has us skew, filter, and edit photos that regular things, like happiness, are worth photographing. As you already stated, the picture may not get a hundred likes on facebook or instagram but to some, the pictures that are never posted on social media are worth the most. We live in a strange time where every moment we have needs to be shared with the world. Not because they’re important, but because we crave attention from “followers”. This post helped remind me that that is not always the case.

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  8. I really enjoyed what you wrote about the woman with the three different faces. We are human, We have different faces and expressions that we choose to put on each day. There are people who put a mask on their face each day to hide their real faces. So those faces the woman is holding could be her masks to cover up her true face.

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  9. I think the reason everyone above me enjoys your blog post so much is mainly because of the fact that you touched upon true beauty, like in Deanna’s photo, as opposed to something fabricated. A lot of the time we focus on what filter to use for our Instagram selfie, instead of looking at the rawness behind each photograph we take. There’s something really special about the vulnerability of a still image. It’s difficult to put your finger on what that special little thing is, but I believe that like you said, we are human. That’s the most important idea here. We are all multi-faceted, we have different emotions going through us every single day. There most definitely is a value to that.

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  10. I enjoyed this post because it is related to my photo essay. My photo essay was about enhancing the photos using applications before you post them online. You are making the argument that it is not necessary to do such a thing, and that a photo should remain as is. Although I like to edit and play around with photos, I do agree with you in a certain sense. People cannot see who the person truly is behind all the edits and filters. The phrase, “what you see is what you’ll get” becomes irrelevant. Great post!

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  11. It is 100% true that photos capture so many emotions in them and that a great deal of the time that is not even noticed. When I look at a picture I try to take the time to notice those emotions coming through. I think that we do need to stop and take a few seconds to just think of the emotions in it.

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  12. I think the reason so many of us don’t take pictures other than happy is because that’s how we want people to view us. If our profile picture on a social media site was one if us sad then that’s how a new person we see us as forever. First impressions are everything. Most of us are also afraid of looking ugly or having our picture be disapproved by many which is why the use of filters is used so often.

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  13. I loved this post. Instead of the usual “smile for the camera,” which is a totally fake smile, you showed true reactions and real emotions. Adding emotions to photographs definitely makes them better.

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  14. This blog post is so true. Half of the time, the smiles we see in photographs are forced and fake, not revealing the true emotion of the person in the picture. The best photographs are the one’s that are real. I know there have been plenty of times where I’ve been sad, but I was told to smile for a picture so I did. I just scrolled down my Instagram profile, and noticed in almost every picture I am smiling. However, I can recall the day I posted those pictures, and I know that happiness is not quite what I was feeling.

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  15. i definitely agree with you in that we do not show any other emotions besides happy by giving a smile. I think we only show this emotion because we want people to view us a happy, good looking person. We do not want to be judged off our ugly cry or mad face. If you go on any social media it is rare to see many emotions besides happy, because you don’t want people to think differently of your life! I agree with your post, adding different emotions to pictures can add beauty.

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  16. It’s interesting how social media has changed photography and our purpose for taking pictures. Instead of it being for us, or to capture memories for generations to come, now we take pictures just to impress our followers for that day. Our photographs have changed with the invention of edits and filters because now we can turn almost any photo into whatever we want. We can change the emotion of the photo through the colors we choose and the cropping we use.

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  17. really interesting! Sometimes there the occasional picture of someone giving their significant other the death glare or silly faces or something. But normally silly faces are posed. Usually its just all smiles, yet we hold so many different emotions as human beings, yet mainly only post happiness. Interesting point.

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  18. I reallo love this blog post! I can’t even I JUST seen it. It’s so true how you sometimes don’t know what people are going through because on any social media site, they can seem like the happiest person.

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